New Mexico is the State with the 8th Worst Unemployment Rate Recovery

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With the U.S. gaining 199,000 jobs in December, below the previous month’s 249,000 jobs, WalletHub today released updated rankings for the States Whose Unemployment Rates Are Bouncing Back Most, along with accompanying videos and audio files, to illustrate which areas of the country have had the best recovery so far.

In order to identify the states whose unemployment rates are bouncing back most, WalletHub compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia based on five key metrics that compare unemployment rate statistics from the latest month for which data is available (December 2021) to key dates in 2019 and 2020.

Below, you can see highlights from the report, along with a WalletHub Q&A.

Unemployment Recovery in New Mexico (1=Most Recovered, 25=Avg.):

  • 15.19% Change in Unemployment (December 2021 vs December 2019)
    • 55,640 unemployed people in December 2021 vs 48,304 in December 2019;
    • 25th worst recovery in the U.S.
  • 12.53% Change in Unemployment (December 2021 vs January 2020)
    • 55,640 unemployed people in December 2021 vs 49,446 in January 2020;
    • 26th best recovery in the U.S.
  • -32.49% Change in Unemployment (December 2021 vs December 2020)
    • 55,640 unemployed people in December 2021 vs 82,423 in December 2020;
    • 26th best recovery in the U.S.
  • 13.81% Change in Not Seasonally Adjusted Continued Claims (December 2021 vs December 2019)
    • 10,551 continued claims in December 2021 vs 9,271 in December 2019;
    • 4th worst recovery in the U.S.
  • 5.8% Unemployment Rate (December 2021)
    • 7th highest unemployment rate in the U.S.

To view the full report and your state’s rank, please visit: https://wallethub.com/edu/states-unemployment-rates/74907

WalletHub Q&A

Will the free test disbursement from the federal government help with unemployment?

“The federal government’s plan to distribute free Covid tests is a good first step toward lowering unemployment rates, but it should be handled more like vaccine distribution to really have a lasting effect,” said WalletHub analyst, Jill Gonzalez. “The federal government should ensure a steady test supply, not a one-and-done handout of four tests per household. Workers will continue to get exposed, and will regularly need to home-test in order to safely return to work. The government still has not taken employees’ situation into account fully.”

How will state vaccine mandates affect unemployment?

“State vaccine mandates will affect unemployment because at least thousands of workers in each state could face the loss of their jobs and eligibility for unemployment benefits,” said Jill Gonzalez, WalletHub analyst. “That being said, it also has a huge effect on public health. In just the city of New York, 60 percent of those working for the Fire Department were vaccinated pre-mandate. Post-mandate, the vaccinated percentage is 94 percent. When extrapolated to the state level, this could mean that a lot of workers are keeping their jobs while also keeping even more people safe.”

With unemployment benefits cut off, why do businesses still have problems finding workers?

“One of the main reasons that businesses still have problems finding workers is the continued presence of the pandemic, especially the Delta variant. Some workers have voluntarily quit their jobs as a way to minimize contact with other people. Other people are waiting to apply for jobs that provide better wages and benefits,” said Jill Gonzalez, WalletHub analyst. “Another reason why businesses have trouble finding workers is that some people have been able to increase their savings and are temporarily comfortable as a result. They may be using the time away from work to reassess their professional choices and potentially pick a new career path.”

What qualities should unemployed people look for when choosing which businesses to apply to?

“The biggest thing that unemployed people should look for when choosing which businesses to apply to is compensation that’s appropriate for their field and skill level. Since there is currently an employment shortage, workers are in a great position to negotiate a worthwhile compensation package,” said Jill Gonzalez, WalletHub analyst. “Other desirable features are the ability to work from home at least part of the time, measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19, a positive and friendly workplace environment, and a short commute.”

Is there a big difference in the unemployment rate among various demographics?

“The unemployment rate does differ sharply among different demographics. The unemployment rate for white people is 3.1%, while it’s much higher, at 6.5%, for black people. The racial disparity is troubling, especially in the context of broader discussions of inequality that have taken place in the past year,” said Jill Gonzalez, WalletHub analyst. “The unemployment rate can fluctuate a lot by age, too; it’s only 2.8% for those ages 45 to 54, but 7.1% for people ages 20 to 24. It makes sense that people who have been in the workforce longer would have more job stability, but we should be concerned about the difficult conditions faced by young people.”

Which state has experienced the biggest increase in unemployment vs. the beginning of 2020?

“Hawaii has experienced the biggest increase in unemployment because the number of unemployed persons jumped by 169% from January 2020 to December 2021, compared to the average increase of 15%,” said Jill Gonzalez, WalletHub analyst. “Hawaii’s overall unemployment rate is 5.7%, compared to the average of 3.9%.”

Which state has experienced the biggest decrease in unemployment vs. the beginning of 2020?

“Nebraska has experienced the biggest decrease in unemployment because it has seen a 44% decrease in the number of unemployed persons from January 2020 to December 2021, compared to the average increase of 15%,” said Jill Gonzalez, WalletHub analyst. “Nebraska’s overall unemployment rate is 1.7%, compared to the average of 3.9%.”

More News:

New Mexico Bipartisan revision to Safe Haven Act would allow for infants to be legally surrendered anonymously in secure “Baby Box”

FGGAM News just received this news release from the New Mexico GOP Senate. PTL!!! We pray that this will bill become law! My prayer is also the Legislature can work together to end abortion in New Mexico one day very soon!

Senator David Gallegos (R) and Senator Leo Jaramillo (D) Introduce “Baby Box” Legislation

Bipartisan revision to Safe Haven Act would allow for infants to be legally surrendered anonymously in secure “Baby Box”

SANTA FE – Senator David Gallegos (R-Lea and Eddy) and Senator Leo Jaramillo (D-Los Alamos, Rio Arriba, Sandoval, And Santa Fe) today introduced bipartisan legislation amending the Safe Haven Act to allow for the installation of baby boxes in all 33 counties. A baby box, as used around the country, is a safety drawer at a firehouse where an infant can be surrendered safely and anonymously for any reason. The boxes are equipped with ventilation and heat regulation, and a silent alarm to alert the rescue team. As it stands currently, the use of baby boxes is not permitted in New Mexico under the Safe Haven Act which specifies that infants can only be surrendered to a healthcare provider, law enforcement officer, or first responder within 90 days of birth to remove liability of abandonment from the parent.

“We have been at the tip of the spear of this issue in the Española Valley,” said Senator Jaramillo. “For years, our city leaders, legislative representatives, and the President of the Española Firefighters Union (IAFF 4339) have been advocating for these devices to save the lives of infants who are born to scared parents with limited options. This legislation will allow my community and communities around the state to install these life saving devices and avoid the next tragedy.”

“We experienced the gut-wrenching reality of what this law can mean to save lives in New Mexico just a few weeks ago in Hobbs,” said Senator Gallegos. “We were fortunate that baby Saul Israel Astorga who was thrown in the dumpster is alive, but we need to do more to ensure this never happens again. We need to educate our children and youth that there is another way. Baby boxes offer another option to allow for infants to be surrendered safely without the guilt of a personal contact with a law enforcement officer or medical provider. If this bill can save just one life, it will be worth every dollar invested in this project.”

The boxes stand to cost the state about $30,000 per installation. This bill appropriates funds for the instillation of one per county.

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