I’m a Gracist, Not a Racist

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The title isn’t a Jesus Chick original thought, it came from the folks of Duck Dynasty who interviewed hamburger man Kenny Moore on their podcast, Unsashamed. Kenny, who owns the Highway 55 Restaurant chain, said at one point in that interview, “I’m a Gracist, not a Racist.” And I thought….. “Oooooo that’s good, I’m so going to adopt that mindset! I am so sick of this racist chatter. If you born white in America you’re automatically labeled a racist. Which is such a racist comment. It’s just one of the many ways our country has gone mad! But Mr. Moore had a wonderful thought for any child of God; if you’re living life the way it should be lived, which is by the example that Jesus lived with and scripture teaches, other than the culture of the country for which people live, color doesn’t enter the conversation.

When I met my friend Juma from Tanzania, his color didn’t surprise me. He’s a black African. It in no way made the conversation awkward. We weren’t talking about color, we were talking about Jesus. The God Who made every color. The idea that anyone would think that one race is above another is ludicrous. God loves all that He creates. Does He have plans for certain races? Oh yes! The Jewish race has been apart of the Master’s plan since the beginning of time.  It doesn’t mean He loves them more, it only means that their plan was the first in place on this earth. And by the way… a part of that plan was that God allowed them to become slaves in the very first book of the Bible when Joseph was sold into slavery to the Egyptians. But the world is not trying to rectify that slavery are they? We’ve not apologized to the nation of Israel.

Grace is first found in scripture in Genesis 6:8 when it says

Genesis 6:8 KJVS

But Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord.

But what about all the others? The earth was full of people. Of those it says:

Genesis 6:7 KJVS

And the Lord said, I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them.

A Dangerous Game

He considered killing them all… but verse 8. Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord. He was the only exception to the rule. God always reserves some, in the worst of times for Himself. There is a remnant according to the election of grace. The elect, those who God chooses. The Creator of all, and the only one who has the right to put anyone above anyone else. Man doesn’t have that power, but they assume it because they want to be God. Anytime we put another person above or below someone else, we’re playing God. And that’s a dangerous game.

We are of that remnant. Which is why Joe Lancaster preached a sermon 10 or so years ago titled “There’s a few of us left.” There’s a few of us who truly care about the things that God cares about. The rest of the world in Noah’s day had stopped caring about the things of God. But Noah was grateful and acceptable to Him. He pleased Him in his service and sacrifices. He was made fun of by men, but he kept serving God even though he had never seen rain, but God said it was on it’s way, and so Noah for 120 years was faithful and it allowed his family to be saved.  But for those who did not care about the things God cared about, they perished.

That’s what’s going to happen in this world that we’re living in now. We are the Noah of the day. But this time God has allowed anyone to get on the ark who believes in the sacrifice His Son made. One rule. That’s it.  And for those of us who have been saved, thinking about the devastation of the flood and the loss of life should make us extremely grateful for grace, and cause us to be Gracist, even to the racist.

Playing for Keeps

The second place grace is mentioned in the Bible is in the story of Lot.

Genesis 19:19 KJVS

[19] Behold now, thy servant hath found grace in thy sight, and thou hast magnified thy mercy, which thou hast shewed unto me in saving my life; and I cannot escape to the mountain, lest some evil take me, and I die:

Lot, his wife and children were allowed to escape because of the grace of God, certainly not because of his righteous behavior. He had moved his family into a city of the vilest behaviors. Pretty much like we’re living in today. Abraham pled their case with the Lord, trying to save the city in Genesis 18 asking, when the Lord said He was going to destroy Sodom and Gommorah,

Genesis 18:23-24 KJVS

[23] And Abraham drew near, and said, Wilt thou also destroy the righteous with the wicked? [24] Peradventure there be fifty righteous within the city: wilt thou also destroy and not spare the place for the fifty righteous that are therein?

He made it all the way to requesting mercy if there would be ten righteous found in the city, but not even those few could be found. So the city, save Lot and his family, were destroyed

For me Lot exemplifies the average American. He may not have participated in the sin of the day but he certainly didn’t depart from it or take a stand. And just like He did in the days of Noah, God destroyed who He said He would destroy, because God is playing for keeps. He will defend who He says, and He will destroy who He says, and those of us under grace, should be be shouting it to the roof tops for others to hear.

The third place we find grace mentioned in the scripture is in the story of Jacob and Esau. The twin sons of Isaac, the grandsons of Abraham.

Winning the Game

Genesis 32:3-5 KJVS

[3] And Jacob sent messengers before him to Esau his brother unto the land of Seir, the country of Edom. [4] And he commanded them, saying, Thus shall ye speak unto my lord Esau; Thy servant Jacob saith thus, I have sojourned with Laban, and stayed there until now: [5] And I have oxen, and asses, flocks, and menservants, and womenservants: and I have sent to tell my lord, that I may find grace in thy sight.

Jacob needed the grace of Esau because his deceitfulness had ruined their relationship and drove him away from home. But now he wanted to come home and it would require mercy from his brother, mercy he was willing to pay for. The kind of mercy that man expects is not God’s kind of mercy. Jacob figured it would cost him something. And that’s what the world thinks now, that there’s no way something as good as Heaven could be without cost to us. But it is. And in knowing that we should offer it to everyone in our lives. Regardless of their skin color, what family they’re from, what country they’re from or anything else that makes us different. Because in the eyes of God, we are simply, His created. And when we look at the world that’s what we should see, whether or not they are different in color, or belief. We all need Grace.

Jacob originally thought that he needed to win the coveted birthright, so he convinced a hungry Esau to trade it for a bowl of soup. But what he altered realized was that all that really mattered was whether or not he was in the will of God, and had peace in his home. We’re not going to have peace in this home, but we are headed to one of the sweetest of peace. And while we’re on the journey we need to bring as many people with us as we can. Be a Gracist, not a racist that’s what wins the game.

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