Today In History; March 19

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Good Morning & God Bless To Every One !

Today is March 19, the 78th day of 2014 and there are 287 days left this year where it is another Blessed Day in the pleasure of our service for our Lord here at:

For God’s Glory Alone Ministries !!!

Good Morning my friends to another Blessed Day here with our Lord. If you read nothing else today, at least take time to listen to the ‘Inspiration Music Video’ below near the bottom if you’d like to know what we need to do to fix this once great country!

So, What Happened Today In 2003?

The war in Iraq, Operation Iraqi Freedom, beginsshock and awe

The United States, along with coalition forces primarily from the United Kingdom, initiates war on Iraq. Just after explosions began to rock Baghdad, Iraq’s capital, U.S. President George W. Bush announced in a televised address, “At this hour, American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger.” President Bush and his advisors built much of their case for war on the idea that Iraq, under dictator Saddam Hussein, possessed or was in the process of building weapons of mass destruction.

Hostilities began about 90 minutes after the U.S.-imposed deadline for Saddam Hussein to leave Iraq or face war passed. The first targets, which Bush said were “of military importance,” were hit with Tomahawk cruise missiles from U.S. fighter-bombers and warships stationed in the Persian Gulf. In response to the attacks, Republic of Iraq radio in Baghdad announced, “the evil ones, the enemies of God, the homeland and humanity, have committed the stupidity of aggression against our homeland and people.”

Though Saddam Hussein had declared in early March 2003 that, “it is without doubt that the faithful will be victorious against aggression,” he went into hiding soon after the American invasion, speaking to his people only through an occasional audiotape. Coalition forces were able to topple his regime and capture Iraq’s major cities in just three weeks, sustaining few casualties. President Bush declared the end of major combat operations on May 1, 2003. Despite the defeat of conventional military forces in Iraq, an insurgency has continued an intense guerrilla war in the nation in the years since military victory was announced, resulting in thousands of coalition military, insurgent and civilian deaths.

After an intense manhunt, U.S. soldiers found Saddam Hussein hiding in a six-to-eight-foot deep hole, nine miles outside his hometown of Tikrit. He did not resist and was uninjured during the arrest. A soldier at the scene described him as “a man resigned to his fate.” Hussein was arrested and began trial for crimes against his people, including mass killings, in October 2005.

In June 2004, the provisional government in place since soon after Saddam’s ouster transferred power to the Iraqi Interim Government. In January 2005, the Iraqi people elected a 275-member Iraqi National Assembly. A new constitution for the country was ratified that October. On November 6, 2006, Saddam Hussein was found guilty of crimes against humanity and sentenced to death by hanging. After an unsuccessful appeal, he was executed on December 30, 2006.

No weapons of mass destruction were found in Iraq.

Other Memorable Or Interesting Events Occurring On March 19 In History:

1687 – French explorer Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle – the first European to navigate the length of the Mississippi River – was murdered by mutineers in present-day Texas;

1702 – On the death of William III of Orange, Anne Stuart, sister of Mary, succeeds to the throne of England, Scotland and Ireland;

1734 – Patriot politician Thomas McKean is born to Scots-Irish Presbyterian parents in Chester County, Pennsylvania. He will eventually serve as president of the state of Delaware, president of the U.S. Congress under the Articles of Confederation and chief justice of Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court;

1748 – English Naturalization Act passes granting Jews right to colonize North American colonies;

1822 – Boston is incorporated as a city;

1863 – The SS Georgiana, said to have been the most powerful Confederate cruiser, is destroyed on her maiden voyage with a cargo of munitions, medicines and merchandise then valued at over $1,000,000. The wreck was discovered on the same day and month, exactly 102 years later by then teenage diver and pioneer underwater archaeologist E. Lee Spence;

1865 – During the American Civil War, at the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, Confederate General Joseph Johnston makes a desperate attempt to stop Union General William T. Sherman’s drive through the Carolinas in the Civil War’s last days; however, Johnston’s motley force cannot stop the advance of Sherman’s mighty army. The Union lost 194 men killed, 1,112 wounded, and 221 missing, while the Confederates lost some 240 killed, 1,700 wounded, and 1,500 missing. About Sherman, Johnston wrote to Lee that, “I can do no more than annoy him.” A month later, Johnston surrendered his army to Sherman;

1903 – The U.S. Senate ratifies the Cuban treaty, gaining naval bases in Guantanamo and Bahia Honda;

1916 – The first US air combat mission begins when eight Curtiss “Jenny” planes of the First Aero Squadron take off from Columbus, New Mexico, in the first combat air mission in U.S. history. The First Aero Squadron, organized in 1914 after the outbreak of World War I, was on a support mission for the 7,000 U.S. troops who invaded Mexico to capture Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa;

1918 – Congress authorizes Daylight Savings Time;

1920 – U.S. Senate rejects Treaty of Versailles for second time refusing to ratify League of Nations’ covenant (maintaining isolation policy);

1931 – In an attempt to lift the state out of the hard times of the Great Depression, the Nevada state legislature votes to legalize gambling. Established in 1905, Las Vegas, Nevada, has since become the gambling and entertainment capital of the world, famous for its casinos, nightclubs, and sporting events. In the first few decades after the legalization of gambling, organized crime flourished in Las Vegas. Today, state gambling taxes account for the lion’s share of Nevada’s overall tax revenues;

1945 – In World War II, the commander of the German Home Army, Gen. Friedrich Fromm, is shot by a firing squad for his part in the July plot to assassinate the Fuhrer. The fact that Fromm’s participation was half-hearted did not save him. Fromm’s last-ditch effort to distance himself from the plot failed. By order of Heinrich Himmler, who was now the new head of the Home Army, Fromm was arrested. In February 1945, he was tried before the People’s Court and denigrated for his cowardice in refusing to stand up to the plotters. But because he went so far as to execute Stauffenberg and his partners on the night of July 20, he was spared the worst punishment afforded convicted conspirators – strangulation on a meat hook. He was shot by a firing squad on March 19;

1945 – Adolf Hitler orders a scorched-earth policy for his retreating German armies in the west and east;

1945 – 724 people were killed when a Japanese dive bomber attacked the carrier USS Franklin off Japan; the ship, however, was saved;

1949 – Following World War II during the (first) Cold War, in a precursor to the establishment of a separate, Soviet-dominated East Germany, the People’s Council of the Soviet Zone of Occupation approves a new constitution. This action, together with the U.S. policy of pursuing an independent pathway in regards to West Germany, contributed to the permanent division of Germany. The postwar status of Germany had become a bone of contention between the United States and the Soviet Union even before the war ended. In October 1949, the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) was declared. Months earlier, in May, the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) had been formally proclaimed. Germany remained a divided nation until the collapse of the communist government in East Germany and reunification in 1990;

1966 – During the Vietnam War, the South Korean Assembly votes to send 20,000 additional troops to Vietnam to join the 21,000 Republic of Korea (ROK) forces already serving in the war zone. The South Korean contingent was part of the Free World Military Forces, an effort by President Lyndon B. Johnson to enlist allies for the United States and South Vietnam. By securing support from other nations, Johnson hoped to build an international consensus behind his policies in Vietnam. The effort was also known as the “many flags” program;

1970 – In the Vietnam War, the Cambodian National Assembly grants “full power” to Premier Lon Nol, declares a state of emergency, and suspends four articles of the constitution, permitting arbitrary arrest and banning public assembly. Lon Nol and First Deputy Premier Prince Sisowath Sirik Matak had conducted a bloodless coup against Prince Norodom Sihanouk the day before and proclaimed the establishment of the Khmer Republic;

1971 – An earthquake sets off a series of calamities—a landslide, flood and avalanche–that results in the destruction of the town of Chungar, Peru, and the death of 600 of its inhabitants. Chungar was a mining camp in the Andes Mountains, where workers and their families lived while exploiting a nearby mine. Only a year earlier, Peru had suffered a similar disaster when two towns were buried by a landslide at Mount Huascaran, also in the Andes Mountains;

1979 – The U.S. House of Representatives began televising its floor proceedings; the live feed was carried by C-SPAN (Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network), which was making its debut;

1982 – In the British Falklands War, Argentinian forces land on South Georgia Island, precipitating war with the U.K.;

1993 – Supreme Court Justice Byron R. White announced plans to retire. White’s departure paved the way for Ruth Bader Ginsburg to become the court’s second female justice;

2004 – The U.S. Army dropped all charges against Capt. James Yee, a Muslim military chaplain at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, who had been accused of mishandling classified information;

2005 – Maverick automotive executive, John DeLorean, an innovative auto industry executive and founder of the DeLorean Motor Company, dies at the age of 80 in New Jersey;

2009 – An Austrian jury sentenced Josef Fritzl, 73, to life in a psychiatric ward for locking his daughter in a dungeon for 24 years, fathering her seven children and letting an eighth die in captivity as a newborn;

2009 – Pope Benedict XVI, visiting Cameroon, told Muslim leaders that true religion rejected violence; the pontiff also held up peaceful coexistence between Christianity and Islam in the country as “a beacon to other African nations.”;

2012 – Wendy’s overtakes Burger King as the second best-selling hamburger chain in the USA;

2013 – Pope Francis officially began his ministry as the 266th pope, receiving the ring symbolizing the papacy and a wool stole exemplifying his role as shepherd of his 1.2-billion strong flock during a Mass at the Vatican;

2013 – It was one year ago Today!

Now, Off To The Fun Stuff!!!

Today’s ‘Let’s Be Friends’ Picture:friends

Today’s Fact Of The Day:

Studies show that people whose hair turns gray in their 20s and are more than 50% gray by the age of 40 have a higher risk of developing osteoporosis.

Today’s Quote For The Day:

For a gallant spirit there can never be defeat.
– Wallis Simpson

Today’s ‘I Fixed It For You Honey’:fixed

Today’s ‘It’s Just An Observation’:

It’s been a brutal winter for many, and winter refuses to loosen its grip on a good chunk of the country even as spring rapidly approaches. But despite what climate alarmists want you to believe, this season’s bone-chilling cold wasn’t and isn’t some fluke; in fact, according to Meterologist Joe D’Aleo, average temperatures across the United States in the December-February period have dropped by 2.26 degrees Fahrenheit over the last two decades based on data from the National Climate Data Center. This occurred despite some notably warm winters. Call us crazy, but that sure doesn’t sound like global warming to us; in fact, Earth as a whole hasn’t experienced any warming for more than 17 years. No wonder they’re now calling it “climate change.”

Today’s Word For The Day:

Genteel (gen·teel) adj.  1. Refined in manner; well-bred and polite.  2. Free from vulgarity or rudeness.  3.Elegantly stylish: genteel manners and appearance.

Today’s ‘Parent & Child Lookalike’ Picture:parent & child

Today’s ‘Daily Motivator’:

If there’s something you intend to do, get started. If you don’t take the first step immediately, it’s not really an intention but merely an empty wish.

Today’s Trivia:

George Washington was scared to death of being buried alive. Just before he died, he demanded his body be kept above ground for a few days in the unlikely event he might come to.

Today’s ‘Impeccable Timing’ Picture:impeccable

Today’s ‘Clever Words For Clever People’:

RELIEF: What trees do in the spring!

Today’s ‘Least We Forget’ Music Video:

At The Wall – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6y64zTRlrmo

Today’s ‘It’s A Dog’s Life’ Picture:dogs life 8

Today’s Verse & Prayer:

The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such things there is no law.
– Galatians 5:22-23

Father, through the Spirit I call upon you. Please fulfill in me the character you possess. I want to exhibit the qualities of your child, Jesus, in whose name I pray. Amen

Today’s Inspirational Music Video:

PUT GOD IN AMERICA – AGAIN – – https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=vEaHAXrAUxQ

Today’s ‘Awe Of God’ Picture:awe

Until Tomorrow – America, Bless GOD!!!

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After serving in the United States Navy for 22 years I retired from the service late in 1991. Having always loved the southwest, shortly after retiring, I moved to the Albuquerque area where I have resided since. Initially I worked as a contractor for approximately 6 years doing cable construction work. That becoming a little dangerous, at an elevated age, I moved into the retail store management environment managing convenience stores for roughly 16 years. With several disabilities, I am now fully retired and am getting more involved with helping Pastor Dewey & Pastor Paul with their operations at FGGAM which pleases my heart greatly as it truly is - "For God's Glory Alone". I met my precious wife Sandy here in Albuquerque and we have been extremely happily married for 18 years and I am the very proud father to Sandy's wonderful children, Tiana, our daughter, Ryan & Ross, our two sons, and proud grandparents to 5 wonderful grandchildren. We attend Christ Full Deliverance Ministries in Rio Rancho which is lead by Pastor's Marty & Paulette Cooper along with Elder Mable Lopez as regular members. Most of my time is now spent split between my family, my church & helping the Pastors by writing here on the FGGAM website and doing everything I can to support this fantastic ministry in the service of our Lord. Praise to GOD & GOD Bless to ALL! UPDATED 2021: Rick and Sandy moved to Florida a few years ago. We adore them and we pray for Rick as he misses Sandy so very, very much!

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